Discover the World of Keowee Valley

Katherine Scott Crawford is an award-winning writer, newspaper columnist, and college English teacher. She’s the author of Keowee Valley, an historical adventure set in the Revolutionary-era Carolinas and in the Cherokee country.

“A glorious debut from a gifted author.”
-Adriana Trigiani, bestselling author of Big Stone Gap and The Shoemaker’s Wife

Keowee Valley is a terrific first novel by Katherine Scott Crawford–a name that should be remembered.”
-Pat Conroy, bestselling author of The Prince of Tides and South of Broad

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Enjoy the Keowee Valley Trailer

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What to Read Right Now: Essays & Stories By Authors I Know

Looking for something new, wonderful, wild, funny, tragic, weird, and/or gorgeous to read? Well, I’ve got some great stuff to share.

Caveat: the following essays and short stories are all by writer-friends of mine who are, like me, also graduates of the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in Writing program. Every semester I was astounded by the talent coming out of the program, and these writers are proof of it.

I’m only providing tidbits of information about this wonderful writers, so please be sure to check out their websites and Facebook pages for more information about them and their other published works. And since VCFA grads tend to publish prolifically, I’ll try to keep this post updated as I learn of more.

Enjoy!

1. “Old Men Dying Young” by Jason Arment

Jason’s essay in Burrow Press Review is about his time serving as a Marine Machine Gunner in Afghanistan–and so much more. I’ve read this several times since it came out, and it strikes at different chords in my intellect and heart each time.

2. Loss Angeles by Mathieu Cailler

Loss Angeles is Mathieu’s debut book of short stories, published by Short Story America. From the publisher: “In this superb debut collection of short stories, Mathieu Cailler weaves tales which bring to life the deeply-human experience with loss and its range of outcomes. From loneliness to recovered relationships, from despair to redemption, from heartbreak to humor, these fifteen stories illuminate the sadness, bewilderment, conflict and ultimate hope which can come from each human being’s inevitable encounters with loss.” For more about Mathieu, check him out on Facebook.

3. “Death cafe: tea, cake, and talk about the end” by Amy Wallen 

Amy’s piece in San Diego Beat is full of her trademark wit and insight. For more of Amy’s wonderful stories, check out her web site and/or (definitely and) buy her L.A. Times bestselling novel, MoonPies and Movie Stars. MoonPies and Movie Stars “is a laugh out loud romp across America [that] pits a fiesty Texas momma against the Hollywood machine.”

4. “Batty’s Wig Bears Witness” by Sophfronia Scott

Sophfronia’s current piece in Sleetmagazine.com is told–no kidding–from the perspective of, and in the voice of, a wig. Be forewarned: it’s a little edgy. Sophfronia is also the author of All I Need to Get By, published by St. Martin’s Press. For more of Sophfronia’s work, check out her website

5. “Doll Baby” by Amanda Forbes Silva

Amanda is a stunning writer of creative nonfiction. Her essay Riding Light Review is about sisterhood, childhood, life. Check out her newest work and more about Amanda at her website. (I’m a particular fan of “Trouper,” her essay about childhood, control, and learning from her mama, in biostories.

6. “Halfway House” by Rachel Groves

Rachel’s story appears in the current issue of Beloit Fiction Journal. To get it, you’ve got to buy the issue. But let me assure you, it’ll be worth it. Rachel is a crazy-good writer–and also happens to be the funniest person I know. She really needs a website, too. You listening, Rachel?

Happy Reading, folks!

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New newspaper column: “Spring cleaning ‘ain’t no joke’”

Erma Bombeck

Erma Bombeck

This week’s newspaper column is up at The Greenville News. It’s all about Spring cleaning–or not. With a few sage tidbits from Louisa May Alcott, Phyllis Diller, and Erma Bombeck.

To read, click here.

Happy Spring!

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New Event: 7th Annual Blue Ridge Bookfest, April 24 – 25th

weweresoldiersI’m excited to announce that I’ll be one of the Author Presenters at the 7th Annual Blue Ridge Bookfest, April 24 – 25 in Flat Rock, North Carolina on the campus of Blue Ridge Community College. I’m thrilled to be joining renowned authors Tommy Hays, Karen White, Terry Kay, Joe Galloway, and more.

My presentation, on and about my debut historical novel, Keowee Valley, will take place Saturday from 11:00 – 11:45 a.m. in Blue Ridge Community College Campus building TEDC (room TBA). Along with other Author Presenters and Exhibiting Authors, I’ll also be signing books that morning and afternoon in the Exhibit Hall.

It looks to be an incredible weekend for book lovers! All events are FREE except for the dinner with Keynote Speaker Joe Galloway on Friday night, and the luncheon on Saturday. There’ll be something for everyone, with plenty of kids’ events, too.

I’m thrilled to have been asked to take part, and I’m looking forward to many of the weekend’s speakers and events. Joe Galloway, the Keynote Speaker, is a venerable war correspondent and former special consultant to Colin Powell. He’s the author of We Were Soldiers Once … and Young, which was made into a movie starring MelKeowee-Valley-screen Gibson and Sam Elliott.

For more information, check out the Blue Ridge Bookfest website here. If you’ve never been to Flat Rock before, it’s a cool and historic little mountain town minutes from Hendersonville, North Carolina–and it’s sure to be drop-dead gorgeous up here in the mountains in April.

I hope to see you there!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New newspaper column: “Everyone has a forest. What’s yours?”

Scout in the Davidson River, one of her happy places.

Scout in the Davidson River, one of her happy places.

The link to the online version of my column this week in The Greenville News is already up. It’s about finding what makes us unique — and much of that has to do with the things and the people we love. For me, it has quite a bit to do with my “happy place.”

I’m wondering what yours is?

To read, click here.

Happy Hump Day, all!

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Essay on Craft in the Winter 2015 Issue of Appalachian Heritage

I’m proud to announce that I’ve just had a craft essay (for you fine reader folks who aren’t writer folks, that’s an essay on and about the craft of creative writing) published in the Winter 2015 issue of Appalachian Heritage magazine.

It focuses on one of my favorite characters in literature, Father Damien (or Agnes) from Louise Erdrich’s novel, The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse. Father Damien is a woman who’s disguised herself as a man and a Catholic priest, in order to minister to her flock of magical ones and misfits on the Ojibwe reservation of Little No Horse.

The full essay is available only in the print version of the issue–the online version has only a portion–but this Winter 2015 issue is chock-full of incredible stuff: short stories, poems, interviews, book reviews and essays. There’s in essay in there by Wendell Berry. Wendell Berry!

If you love the Southern Appalachians, have lived there once or live there now, just hold the spirit of such wild places in your heart, of simply enjoy daggum. good. writing, you should consider subscribing to Appalachian Heritage. I promise, it’ll be worth it!

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Today’s newspaper column: “Hot Springs is a road trip worth taking”

Appalachian Trail marker on the bridge over the French Broad River, Hot Springs, NC

Appalachian Trail marker on the bridge over the French Broad River, Hot Springs, NC

My column today in The Greenville News is all about Hot Springs, North Carolina–where my husband and I recently celebrated our 10-year anniversary.

Hot Springs has hiking and history, good food and drink, rivers, mountains, ancient Cherokee art, and ghost stories galore. Plus, it was voted 2012′s Best Small Mountain Town by Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine.

Looking for a weekend road trip or a Spring escape? Check it out by reading here.

Standing atop Paint Rock, looking out over the French Broad - near Hot Springs, NC

Standing atop Paint Rock, looking out over the French Broad – near Hot Springs, NC

 

 

 

Paint Rock from the road - near Hot Springs, NC

Paint Rock from the road – near Hot Springs, NC

 

Iron Horse Station - Hot Springs, NC

Iron Horse Station – Hot Springs, NC

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Today’s newspaper column: “As winter roars its last, hunker down with a good book”

One of my many bookshelves. If you listen hard, you'll hear my husband telling me it's time to Spring clean.

One of my many bookshelves. If you listen hard, you’ll hear my husband telling me it’s time to Spring clean.

Today’s column in The Greenville News is all about cozying up with a good book … perhaps one from your past.

What were your favorite books as a child or teenager? What would you read again if you could?

I hope you enjoy! To read the column, click here.

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Today’s newspaper column: “Please, never close school again”

Snow walk late last night.

Snow walk late last night.

Today’s column in The Greenville News is particularly appropriate, even if I date myself. When I wrote it, my girls had missed four days of school due to snow, ice, and brutal cold: today marks the ninth school day they’ve missed.

Still, I wouldn’t give up these days in the snow with them for anything!

Hope you enjoy!

Read here.

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Photos from Western North Carolina’s “Winter Event”

Yesterday, we woke up to a surprise snowfall of about 5 inches.

Actually, a little after midnight the night before last, I noticed that it was snowing. I watched the snow illuminated in the street light across the street, and saw that it was falling a lot like the snow does in Vermont, where I’ve spent a good amount of time in the past.

I was so jacked I sat straight up in bed at 6 a.m. yesterday morning, hopped up onto my knees and yanked open the blinds. (This delighted my husband.) Outside was a winter wonderland–not an indention, not one tire track, not one blade of grass peeping up out of the snow. I was THRILLED.

We played most of the day in it. (The girls and I did; their daddy had to walk to work.) We built snow ladies, sledded, and attempted to swing on the swingset. We tossed snowballs for the dog to catch and tried to find our friends at the big sledding hill in town, but sadly a whiny toddler and not driving a Subaru like every other person in Western North Carolina kept us from making it there.

Some photos from our day in the snow:

snowwylie snowbaby shoveling equallyexcited2 DSC01759

The second “snow event” occurs tonight and tomorrow morning. Some weather outlets are predicting 10 + inches, while others say just 3.

We’ve got pancake mix, library books, and cookie dough … and we’ll see!

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Today’s newspaper column: “King’s ‘Letter’ holds lessons to remember”

MLK-in-jail-436x580Today’s column in The Greenville News is about the best letter I’ve ever read–Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail”–and why I teach it to my college students each semester.

February is also Black History Month, of course, so that’s just a plus!

Read here.

I hope y’all enjoy, and if you do, I hope you’ll share.

Stay warm!

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